Featured New Nonfiction

By: Brown, Daniel, 1951-
Daniel James Brown's robust book tells the story of the University of Washingtons 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans.
By: Clinton, Hillary Rodham
Hillary Clinton's candid reflections about the key moments during her time as Secretary of State, as well as her thoughts about how to navigate the challenges of the 21st century.
By: Muldrow, Diane.
A whimsical "guide to life" for grown fans of classic Little Golden Books combines lighthearted advice with nostalgic illustrations from 60 favorites that convey such nuggets of wisdom as "Don't forget to enjoy your wedding!," "Be a hugger" and "Sweatpants are bad for morale."
By: Gladwell, Malcolm, 1963-
The best-selling author of Outliers uncovers the hidden rules that shape the balance between the weak and the mighty, the powerful and the dispossessed.
By: Levitt, Steven D., author.
In this follow-up to their international bestseller Freakonomics, the authors present an essential decision-making handbook that, analyzing the decisions we make, the plans we create and the morals we choose, shows how their insights can be applied to daily life to make smarter, harder and better decisions.
By: Mills, Marja.
One journalist's memoir of her personal friendship with Harper Lee and her sister, drawing on the extraordinary access they gave her to share the story of their lives. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is one of the best loved novels of the twentieth century. But for the last fifty years, the novel's celebrated author, Harper Lee, has said almost nothing on the record. Journalists have trekked to her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama, where Harper Lee, known by her friends as Nelle, has lived with her sister, Alice, for decades, trying and failing to get an interview with the author. But in 2001, the Lee sisters opened their door for Chicago Tribune reporter Marja Mills. It was the beginning of a long conversation-and a friendship that has continued ever since. Mills was given a rare opportunity to know Nelle Harper Lee, to be part of the Lees' life in Alabama, and to hear them reflect on their upbringing, their corner of the Deep South, how To Kill a Mockingbird affected their lives, and why Nelle Harper Lee chose to never write another novel.
By: Piketty, Thomas, 1971- author.
What are the grand dynamics that drive the accumulation and distribution of capital? Questions about the long-term evolution of inequality, the concentration of wealth, and the prospects for economic growth lie at the heart of political economy. But satisfactory answers have been hard to find for lack of adequate data and clear guiding theories. In this work the author analyzes a unique collection of data from twenty countries, ranging as far back as the eighteenth century, to uncover key economic and social patterns. His findings transform debate and set the agenda for the next generation of thought about wealth and inequality. This original work reorients our understanding of economic history and confronts us with sobering lessons for today.
By: Klein, Edward, 1936-
A behind-the-scenes look at the rivalry between the Obamas and the Clintons reveals the animosity, jealousy, and competition that divides America's two most powerful political couples.
By: Lewis, Michael (Michael M.)
A small group of Wall Street guys who figure out that the U.S. stock market has been rigged for the benefit of insiders the big Wall Street banks expose this institutionalized injustice and go to war to fix it.
By: Chast, Roz, author, illustrator.
In her first memoir, Roz Chast brings her signature wit to the topic of aging parents. Spanning the last several years of their lives and told through four-color cartoons, family photos, and documents, and a narrative as rife with laughs as it is with tears, Chast's memoir is both comfort and comic relief for anyone experiencing the life-altering loss of elderly parents.
By: Hillenbrand, Laura.
On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared--Lt. Louis Zamperini. Captured by the Japanese and driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini would answer desperation with ingenuity; suffering with hope, resolve, and humor.