National Book Award Poetry

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By: Ferry, David, 1924-
Winner of the 2012 National Book Award for Poetry. To read David Ferry’s Bewilderment is to be reminded that poetry of the highest order can be made by the subtlest of means. The passionate nature and originality of Ferry’s prosodic daring works astonishing transformations that take your breath away. In poem after poem, his diction modulates beautifully between plainspoken high eloquence and colloquial vigor, making his distinctive speech one of the most interesting and ravishing achievements of the past half century.
By: Doty, Mark.
A collection of top-selected works and new poems by the author of Dog Years features pieces that meditate on such topics as mortality, the instructive presence of animals, and art's ability to give shape to human life.
By: Hass, Robert.
A first new collection in ten years by the former U.S. poet laureate and author of Sun Under Wood reflects on the beauty and energy of the physical world as well as life in contemporary America, in a stylistically varied compendium that includes the piece, "Envy of Other People's Poems." 25,000 first printing.
By: Merwin, W. S. (William Stanley), 1927-
Presents a collection of the author's best poems along with new works.
By: Valentine, Jean.
Presents a collection of the author's established works in addition to new poems, which deal with such topics as death, aging, and the passage of time.
By: Stone, Ruth.
A collection of sardonic, crafty poems questions the role of convention in everyday life.
By: Clifton, Lucille, 1936-2010.
Nineteen new poems as well as selections from the author's earlier collections explore human suffering, the tragedy of violence, and theological mysteries.
By: Stern, Gerald, 1925-
Offers a selection of the author's poems from his persons collections, including verses from "Rejoicings," "Lucky Life," "Stepping Out of Poetry," "The Red Coal," "Lovesick," "Bread Without Sugar," and "Odd Mercy," as well as newer works
By: Glück, Louise, 1943-
The author shares her dreamlike poetry, including "Theory of Memory," "The Melancholy Assistant," and "The Couple in the Park."
By: Szybist, Mary, 1970-
Winner of the 2013 National Book Award for Poetry * An NPR, Slate, Oregonian, Kansas City Star, Willamette Week, and Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year * Amazon's Best Book of the Year in Poetry 2013 *In Incarnadine, Mary Szybist restlessly seeks out places where meaning might take on new color. One poem is presented as a diagrammed sentence. Another is an abecedarium made of lines of dialogue spoken by girls overheard while assembling a puzzle. Several poems arrive as a series of Annunciations, while others purport to give an update on Mary, who must finish the dishes before she will open herself to God. One poem appears on the page as spokes radiating from a wheel, or as a sunburst, or as the cycle around which all times and all tenses are alive in this moment. Szybist's formal innovations are matched by her musical lines, by her poetry's insistence on singing as a lure toward the unknowable. Inside these poems is a deep yearning--for love, motherhood, the will to see things as they are and to speak. Beautiful and inventive, Incarnadine is the new collection by one of America's most ambitious poets.
By: Ferry, David, 1924-
Winner of the 2012 National Book Award for Poetry.To read David Ferry’s Bewilderment is to be reminded that poetry of the highest order can be made by the subtlest of means. The passionate nature and originality of Ferry’s prosodic daring works astonishing transformations that take your breath away. In poem after poem, his diction modulates beautifully between plainspoken high eloquence and colloquial vigor, making his distinctive speech one of the most interesting and ravishing achievements of the past half century. Ferry has fully realized both the potential for vocal expressiveness in his phrasing and the way his phrasing plays against—and with—his genius for metrical variation. His vocal phrasing thus becomes an amazingly flexible instrument of psychological and spiritual inquiry. Most poets write inside a very narrow range of experience and feeling, whether in free or metered verse. But Ferry’s use of meter tends to enhance the colloquial nature of his writing, while giving him access to an immense variety of feeling. Sometimes that feeling is so powerful it’s like witnessing a volcanologist taking measurements in the midst of an eruption. Ferry’s translations, meanwhile, are amazingly acclimated English poems. Once his voice takes hold of them they are as bred in the bone as all his other work. And the translations in this book are vitally related to the original poems around them. From Bewilderment October The day was hot, and entirely breathless, so The remarkably quiet remarkably steady leaf fall Seemed as if it had no cause at all. The ticking sound of falling leaves was like The ticking sound of gentle rainfall as They gently fell on leaves already fallen, Or as, when as they passed them in their falling, Now and again it happened that one of them touched One or another leaf as yet not falling, Still clinging to the idea of being summer: As if the leaves that were falling, but not the day, Had read, and understood, the calendar.
By: Hayes, Terrance.
A fourth collection by the author of Wind in a Box investigates through verse how humans construct experience and combines the loftiness of dreams and the reality of everyday life into poetry that is both dark and buoyant. Original.
By: Doty, Mark.
A collection of top-selected works and new poems by the author of Dog Years features pieces that meditate on such topics as mortality, the instructive presence of animals, and art's ability to give shape to human life.
By: Hass, Robert.
A first new collection in ten years by the former U.S. poet laureate and author of Sun Under Wood reflects on the beauty and energy of the physical world as well as life in contemporary America, in a stylistically varied compendium that includes the piece, "Envy of Other People's Poems." 25,000 first printing.