November 12: Anti-Racism Post-Election

Recommended resources:

Read: "Will The Biden-Harris Administration Rescind Trump’s Diversity Training Restrictions?" - Dana Brownlee (Forbes)

 

Discussion:

  • What anti-racist ideas and actions have we focused on so far?
  • What anti-racist actions do we want to see happen in the next four years?
  • How can we use this energy as momentum moving forward? Where do we start?

Follow-up actions:


October 22: Racial Injustice in the News

Recommended resources:

Discussion

  • View: “Unconscious Bias: Do Newsrooms Struggle To Report On Race Issues?” (Thomson Reuters Foundation)
  • As you interact with news about racial injustice, have you noticed differences in how certain stories are reported?
  • What are some ways that Black, Indigenous, and people of color are treated differently in news coverage?
  • Should a person's merit/accomplishments be considered when reporting on a crime they committed?

Follow-up actions: 

  • Read: Race Forward's 2015 Race Reporting Guide: "Seven Harmful Racial Discourse Practices to Avoid" (pp.19-24)
  • Support more diverse newsrooms and newspapers that are representative of different communities
  • Seek out additional news coverage if you find yourself getting comfortable with one news source
  • Ask yourself: which details of this news story are missing? Which details are being unfairly scrutinized?

October 8: Policing

Recommended resources:

Discussion with guests from Bremerton Police Department: Laurel MacIntyre-Howard (behavioral health navigator), Sergeant Tim Garrity, and Lieutenant Aaron Elton

  • Improving outreach to community groups and strengthening existing connections; identifying job boards to invite people of color to consider careers in law enforcement
  • Identifying grant writing resources to assist with hiring more behavioral health navigators
  • Improving police accountability measures and changing the culture of policing from within

Follow-up resources: 


September 24: The Wealth Gap

Recommended resources:

Discussion:

  • For BIPOC participants: have you experienced financial barriers?
  • Why are proposed solutions (like "baby bonds", reparations, or increased taxes on the wealthy) so difficult to discuss with each other?
  • As individuals, what are some short-term and long-term actions we can take/support to begin to close the wealth gap?

Follow-up actions:


September 10: White Culture

Recommended resources:

Discussion

  • View The Whiteness Project
  • If you identify as white: What is your experience of white culture? How do you describe your culture?
  • If you don't identify as white: How would you describe white culture? What are some similarities and differences between your culture and white culture?
  • For everyone: How have aspects of white culture led to the casual and overt racism we see in America?

Follow-up actions: check out these resources recommended by the group


August 27: Talking to Family & Friends

Recommended resources:

Discussion:

  • View "How to talk about race with racist white parents and family" (WA Post)
  • Have you tried to have conversations on race with your family/friends? How did it go?
  • What were you feeling at the time? E.g. nervous, angry, scared
  • What worked? What would you do differently next time?
  • What tools/skills do you feel would better equip you for these conversations?

Strategies/Tips from Dispute Resolution Center trainer Sophie Morse:

  • Listening to Understand & Curiosity 
  • Ask open-ended Questions … and question the answers! 
  • Develop agreements – how are the two of us going to have these conversations so neither of us walks away feeling scarred (uncomfortable is ok, and expected). 
  • Preparation; Do research. I don’t like being caught off guard by [racist] talking points. I want to have my facts handy. If they have different facts, one approach is to keep with either I statements or “We” statements: “We don’t seem to have the same information on this topic” and see where that goes. 
  • Find common ground and build from there. Always connect first. 
  • Avoid jargon. Just not helpful. 
  • Set boundaries. Your house, your Facebook page, your rules!! 
  • Assume best intentions, and point out that intent =/= impact! 
  • Part of white supremacy culture is about not revealing emotions, and having to do or say things “just right.” Both of which serve to keep us from having conversations that deeply matter, because those conversations will be messy. 

August 13: Intersectionality

Recommended resources:

Discussion

  • View the Social Identity Wheel.
  • In your own life, do you think about some identities more than others? Which ones, and why?
  • Which identities are important to you that others don’t always acknowledge?
  • By prioritizing certain identities over others in our society, how do we perpetuate systems of oppression?

Follow-up actions: 

  • Explore media from different identities, cultures, and perspectives: books, movies, TV, music, art
  • Ask yourself: whose perspectives are you prioritizing? Whose perspectives are you ignoring? Why?
  • Article: “Go Ahead, Speak for Yourself” - Kwame Anthony Appiah  

July 23: Exploring (Micro)aggressions

Recommended resources:

Discussion:

Follow-up actions: check out these resources recommended by the group


July 9: Acknowledging Our Biases

Recommended resources:

Discussion:

Follow-up actions:


June 25: What is anti-racism?

Recommended resources:

Discussion:

  • What have you found challenging about anti-racist work?

Follow-up actions: check out these resources recommended by the group